Academic Course Descriptions

Agriculture

Introduction to Agricultural Industry
This orientation course is open to all grade levels and provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, agricultural mechanics. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. (One credit)

Ag Science
This orientation course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to Agriculture course. Major units of instruction include: soil science, advanced plant science, advanced animal science, and agricultural mechanics. Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Intro to Ag

Ag Sales and Marketing
This course is designed to develop student knowledge and skills in agricultural sales, agribusiness marketing, commodity marketing, and general problem solving. Instructional units include: agricultural economic principles, marketing and advertising, product development, sales techniques and strategies, communicating with employees and customers, managing risk, studying various agricultural companies and career opportunities, and agricultural problem solving. Computer software applications and the Internet will be integrated through data management, inventories, and accounting. Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Intro to Ag (offered every other year)

Agricultural Business Management
This course will develop student’s understanding of the agricultural industry relating to the United States and World marketplace. Instructional units include: business ownership types, planning and organizing the agribusiness, financing the agribusiness, keeping and using records in an agribusiness, operating the agribusiness, agricultural law, taxes, and developing employability skills. Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Intro to Ag

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE I)
This course is designed to establish knowledge and skills in various agricultural careers. Students will gain credit by establishing a project at their home, at a local business, or at their school usually after normal school hours. Example projects may include, but are not limited to: working at a garden center, raising vegetables/grain/livestock, conducting agriscience experiments in a greenhouse, and training horses at a stable. Students will be required to verity their experiences by keeping written or computerized records including: business agreements, budgets, inventories, daily activities, hours worked, income and expenses, total earnings, depreciation, and net worth. Instructor supervision will be conducted to the student’s home or place of employment. SAE records will be evaluated at least once per month. In addition, SAE lessons are integrated in each agricultural course. SAE participation can lead to full-time employment, scholarships, and awards through the FFA. His course will also allow time for preparation for the various Career Development Events (CDEs) that the FFA has to offer. (Ex: Livestock Judging, Public Speaking, Ag Mechanics, Ag Business, etc.) (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Intro to Ag and Permission from Instructor

BSAA (Biological Science Applications in Agriculture) *Full Year class
Semester 1 - Plant Science
This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of plant growth and management in agriculture and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions. Topics of study are in the areas of initiating plant growth - germination, plant sensory mechanisms, enzyme action, absorption, and managing plant growth - photosynthesis, respiration, translocation, metabolism, and growth regulation. The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Semester 2 - Animal Science
This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of science by associating scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of animal agriculture and specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in the animal industry. Topics of study are in the areas of growth and development of animals - embryology, ethology, nutrition, immunity systems, and processing animal products - preservation, fermentation, and pasteurization. The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Intro to Ag and Ag Science (offered every other year)

Business and Technology

Accounting
The textbook for this course is the Century 21 Accounting. Program goals include: knowing how accounting relates to careers, accounting terminology, understanding accounting concepts, principles and practices, and how to apply accounting procedures for sole proprietorship, partnerships, and corporations. Accounting procedures are described, drilled and practiced, then reinforced.

Accounting I - Open to all grades (One credit)
Accounting II - *Prerequisite: Accounting I (One credit)

Computer Concepts
This course will expose the students to Microsoft Office and Open Office. Students will use and compare the office suite programs for similarities and differences. Students will complete various projects using these applications. (One credit)

CEO
Entrepreneurship courses acquaint students with the knowledge and skills necessary to own and operate their own businesses. Topics from several fields typically form the course content: economics, marketing principles, human relations and psychology, business and labor law, legal rights and responsibilities of ownership, business and financial planning, finance and accounting, and communication. Several topics surveyed in Business Management courses may also be included.

Fine Arts

Art I
Art I (Creative Art)—Comprehensive courses provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art. These courses may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. Initial courses cover the language, materials, and processes of a particular art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art. As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles. Although Creative art courses focus on creation, they may also include the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.

Art II
Art II (Art History) – introduces students to significant works of art, artists, and artistic movements that may have shaped the art world and have influenced or reflected periods of history. These courses often emphasize the evolution of art forms, techniques, symbols, and themes.

Language Arts

English I
This course consists of the study of formal English grammar, paragraph and short essay writing, short stories, poetry, a novel, and Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Spelling and vocabulary will be stressed throughout the year. (One Credit)

English II
This course continues English grammar and usage study. It also includes the following units: advanced paragraph writing, short story, poetry, a novel, spelling, vocabulary, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, and the library research paper. The research paper is a course requirement, and the following steps are required in the formulation of the paper: outline, bibliography cards, note cards, rough draft, final copy with parenthetical documentation, and a works cited page. (One credit)

English III
This course covers American literature and its relationship to American history. Writing focuses on narrative and expository essays. Grammar, usage, and mechanics are reviewed in preparation for the SAT test. (One Credit)

English IV
This class is a study of England’s literary works from the Anglo-Saxon Period to the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the historic background, the characteristics, and the outstanding writers of-each of the major periods. Types of literature include poetry, essays, drama, short story, and a novel. Several short papers may be required during the course. (One credit)

College-Bound Writing *(Dual credit class)
This is offered to seniors and will cover the total writing experience from the beginning thought processes to the final writing of the complete expository composition. The emphasis is on writing literate, organized, coherent essays and basic research papers. This course will also include advanced sentence structure, correct usage, and punctuation. The study of vocabulary and correct word choice will be an essential part of this class. (One credit)

Speech * (Dual Credit Class)
Students will develop speech writing and presentation skills by preparing and delivering a variety of different types of speeches of varying lengths according to class requirements. Writing, grammar, spelling, and punctuation will be an integral part of evaluation of all written work. Presentation techniques will be stressed. Students will have experience speaking in a variety of situations under differing circumstances. Videotaping of speeches is anticipated allowing students the opportunity for self-criticism to improve delivery techniques. Prepared as well as extemporaneous speeches will be included. (One credit)

Novels
Literature courses offer the opportunity for students to study and reflect upon the themes presented in the body of literature being presented. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the reading selection and as they understand how the work reflects society’s problems and culture. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions are often required. Literature courses may survey representative works, reflect a particular genre or a specific theme, or survey works of a particular time or people.

Mathematics

Mathematics I
This course will formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Mathematics 1 will deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Mathematics 1 uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. This course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied and improves problem solving. (One credit)

Mathematics II
This course will extend student’s knowledge of functions to new functions, in particular, quadratic and polynomial functions. Students will also complete a study of similarity and trigonometry, area and volume, probability and counting methods, and circles with quadratic and algebraic representations. The eight Mathematical Practice Standards will be applied throughout.
*Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 or Accelerated 8th grade and teacher recommendation.

Mathematics III
This course, topics from algebra, geometry, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, and mathematical analysis are interwoven to form a fully integrated text. (One credit)

Advanced Math
This course is for seniors who have completed Algebra 2 and Geometry. It reviews basic concepts of Algebra and extends concepts of Algebra 2, including series and limits. It also includes a semester in trigonometry. (One credit)

Calculus
This course treats all the topics normally covered in an Advanced Placement AB-Level program. The text begins with review of concepts and skills required for calculus. Numerous applications to physics, chemistry, engineering, and business are also treated in both the lesson and the problem sets. Use of this text has allowed students to take the Advanced Placement examination and score well. (One credit)

Statistics
This course is an elementary statistics course designed to introduce statistical concepts for a variety of courses of study. The applications span a broad range of topics. Students will have opportunities for using graphing calculators and spreadsheets for solving statistical problems. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Algebra II or permission from instructor

Science

Earth & Space Science
Earth and Space Science is a course focusing on the study of the Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and its celestial environment. Students enrolled in this course analyze and describe Earth’s interconnected systems and how they are changing due to natural processes and human influence. Topics covered include rocks, minerals, natural resource management, sculpturing of Earth’s surface, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, geologic history, the atmosphere, weather, climate, history of astronomy, the solar system, stars, and galaxies. (One credit)

Physical Science
This is an introductory course to the physical sciences, which include basic chemistry and physics. This course supplies students with necessary skills & knowledge to be successful in future chemistry and physics classes. It would be an asset to students who are planning a Tech-prep curriculum. Laboratory activities consist of basic lab skills & procedures, safety, & experiments in physical phenomena. Basic math skills are required. (One credit)

Biology I
This is an introductory course in biology. Studies include cell structure, cellular processes, genetics, ecology, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Laboratory activities consist of observation and modeling of natural phenomena. (One credit)

Biology II * (Dual Credit Class)
This course is an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. Topics include extensions of studies from Biology l such as cells, cellular transports genetics, and genetic diseases. Second semester involves studies of human anatomy and includes dissection of a rat. The course also includes in-depth study of how species change over time. (One credit)
Prerequisites: Minimum of Junior standing, having completed Biology I.

Introduction to Chemistry
Introduction to chemistry is a two semester class for high school students who have completed physical science. This course will help prepare students to complete General Chemistry for college credit, emphasizing problem solving. Students explore the fundamental principles of chemistry which characterize the properties of matter and how it reacts. Computer-based and traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, atomic structure, electron configuration, the periodic table, bonding, gas laws, properties of liquids and solids, solutions, stoichiometry, reactions, equilibrium, acids and bases. (One credit)

Chemistry * (Dual Credit Class)
This is an introductory course in chemistry. The course supplies students with basic knowledge of chemistry and includes the study of elements, atoms, atomic structure, electron configuration, chemical bonding, chemical equations, stoichiometric calculations, states of matter, solutions, acids and bases, and thermodynamics. Laboratories require basic lab skills and safety and examine basic chemical phenomena. (One credit)
Prerequisites: Minimum of Junior standing, having completed Physical Science

Social Science

U.S. History I
This is a course for juniors only. It encompasses a history of the United States from the beginning of the Civil War through WWII. Students will work with maps; utilize critical thinking skills and source documents. A minimum of one project (incorporating computer technology) per semester will be required. All students must pass the U.S. and Illinois Constitution exams in order to graduate from high school. (One credit)

U.S. History II
This course is for seniors only. It continues on from U.S. History I from the period of time in the United States from the end of the WWII to present day. Students will do some work with maps; utilize critical thinking skills, and primary source documents. One report each semester and a project second semester (both incorporating computer technology) will be required. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: U.S. History I

Modern World Geography
Modern World Geography provides students with an overview of world geography in the 21st century and can vary widely in the topics covered. Topics typically include, but are not limited to, the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationships between people and the land; economic production and development; the movement of people, goods, and ideas; and societal organization and structure with an emphasis on understanding the relationships within society and how those relationships change over time. (One credit)

Psychology * (Dual Credit Class)
This will be a year-long introductory course in the study of human behavior. It will include subjects such as development of the personality, various theories of psychology, abnormal psychology, and will include tests, papers, projects, quizzes and homework. (One credit)

Civics
This course will examine the general structure and functions of American systems of government, the roles and responsibilities of citizens to participate in the political process, and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system. (One-half credit)

Current Events
Contemporary World Issues courses enable students to study political, economic, and social issues facing the world. These courses may focus on current issues, examine selected issues throughout the 20th century, and look at historical causes or possible solutions.

Consumer Science

Resource Management
This is the State required course of graduation. It is a semester course and covers all aspects of being a consumer and consumer education class. (One-half credit)

Foreign Language

Spanish I
Students will learn to speak, understand, read and write Spanish by studying vocabulary and grammar. You will also learn about the culture of the Spanish-speaking people by reading, current events, research, and class projects. (One credit)

Spanish II
Students will continue to learn Spanish through vocabulary, grammar, more speaking and reading in Spanish. You will continue to study the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish III
Student’s use of Spanish will continue to improve through the assigned reading and oral discussion, written responses of the reading, as well as additional material. Students will also improve vocabulary through watching videos depicting Hispanic life, and reading magazines and newspapers in Spanish. (One credit)
*Prerequisite: Spanish II

Industrial Arts

Industrial Arts I - Production/Transportation Technology
A one-year general orientation course in the study of industry - its history, problems, processes, and products. Industry is studied in relation to basic areas such as drafting, woodworking, metalworking, electronics, electricity, machine operations, transportation systems, energy systems, and safety. Projects are produced in most of the areas of study, which demonstrate mastery, and use of skills. Students will pay a lab fee to cover the costs of materials used in this class. (One credit)

Industrial Arts II - Communications/Energy Technology
The first semester students study industrial manufacturing and production systems including the historical development of mass production and its effect on the development of this country. Students learn through laboratory experiences in designing, drawing plans, planning and laying out a production line and producing a product using mass production and assembly line techniques. Financial matters including stock sales, tit and toss calculations, and materials purchasing, cost estimating and analysis, pro records keeping are also covered. Second semester course is a further study of the principles, processes, tools equipment, and practices employed in the prostration, fabrication, and repair of sheet metal products and assemblies with emphasis on shearing, bending, forming, and hand, bench, and power tools, sheet metal layout methods, bending and cutting.(One credit)
*Prerequisite: Industrial Arts I (one credit)

Physical Education


This course is required for each year a student is in high school. Various skills will be taught and will be tested with written quizzes or demonstrative tests. Activities include basketball, volleyball, horseshoes, archery, bowling, soccer, hockey, badminton as well as many other team and lifelong sports. All classes are co-ed and student participation is heavily counted in grading. (One credit)

Health

This class is one semester is usually opposite Driver's Ed. This class covers every aspect of human health, good and bad. There will be a lot of group work and discussion. (One-half Credit)